Starting Over – A Happy Tax Story

 

Red Crossed Bandaids

Zig Ziglar said, “We cannot start over, but we can begin now and make a new ending”.

The Problem:

A few years back, I had a contact call me in a panic after she had finished her initial attempt at preparing her own tax return. She owed almost $5,000 and was shocked that she owed that much money.   It was scary because she didn’t have the money to pay that kind of tax bill. She called me for help and advice.

The Beginning:

To put this into perspective, this was her 1st year to file Single.

Previously, her husband of almost 25 years had handled their tax returns. They had filed Married Filing Joint and had dependent children. At work, her tax withholding was based upon her previous situation, not her present circumstance.

Originally, she thought filing a tax return would be simple and at first, it seemed as if it was. TurboTax asked her questions and she completed the answers the best that she could.

The Middle:

After receiving her call, we agreed to meet and I reviewed what she had completed, but had not yet filed. After a good interview process, we had a game plan and she began to collect tax related documents that could be used to determine the feasibility of itemizing rather than to use the standard deduction.

The End:

After several weeks of back and forth questions and answers, I had the documentation that I needed to help her complete a revised return. This resulted in about a $3,900 savings and she thankfully, filed her federal and state tax returns.

The Zig Ziglar quote is great, but it did not fully apply in this situation. She could “start over” and could also make a new ending.

Since that time, we work together every year. We don’t just wait until the tax season to talk. We use tax planning and action during the year to manage her annual tax bill and to keep it as low as possible. Frequently she knows her current tax situation before 12/31. We don’t know the exact number, but she does have the comfort of “No Surprises” when the tax season officially arrives.

The Lessons:

  • Sometimes, a 2nd look can make a big difference
  • If the tax filing process is new to you, having someone help you, may prove to be beneficial
  • If you ask someone to help,  try to find someone that will take the time to educate you about the process.
  • It is empowering to learn and apply the tax rules; it saves you money 

Thanks for reading!

Deborah Ann Fox, CPA is working to make a difference in peoples lives and wallets, by helping them build and protect their financial health.

Debbie offers free 30 minute no obligation consultations and is available for appointments – including remote. More information is available at http://www.debfoxfinancial.com. Questions or comments can be sent to debfoxfinancial@gmail.com 

Financial Health: 8 Ways to Check

8 Ways to Check and/or Protect your Financial Health

Many of us see the doctor for an annual check-up.

Probably, even more of us have our car checked on a routine basis.

Few of us take a holistic view of our financial health, particularly, on a routine basis.

I encourage you to be an early adopter, change this, and become proactive with your financial health.

For our physical health, our doctor might check our weight, blood pressure/pulse, LDL/HDL and then compares the findings to our initial baseline results.

For our financial health, we should also establish a baseline /benchmark and then, periodically compare our results to our previous records,

How are we going to know how we are doing unless we take the time to look?

How are we going to tell if we are getting better if we don’t have an initial baseline to compare to?

The factors that you choose to use are up to you. My list includes possibilities for you to consider. Record your answers & date it. Some responses will result in a number, others will be a yes/no and perhaps initiate a new thought process. Here are my suggestions: 

  1. Determine your Personal Net Worth
  • Create a Balance Sheet: Assets = Liabilities & Equity
  • Assets are the value of what you own; liabilities are what you owe
  • Assets – Liabilities = Equity in a business or your personal Net Worth
  1. Review the Liability limits on your insurance policies (Homeowners, Renters, Auto, Business). Is the limit high enough to protect your Net Worth if something serious happened? You don’t want to leave your “assets” (money) exposed to risk of loss without making the conscious decision to do so.
  1. Cash Flow- Positive or Negative?
  • Money coming in, money going out, and when?
  • Is it steady through out the year or does it fluctuate?
  • Are you spending more than you bring in?
  1. Liquidity – Emergency Fund +
  • Emergency Fund savings for 3-6 months of living expenses?
  • Any other “reserves” you keep – Christmas or vacation fund?
  1. Your Personal Savings rate
  • Do you try to pay yourself first?
  • Are “you” built into your required monthly expenses?
  • Do you fully participate in your company’s matching program?
  1. Determine your Debt/Income Ratio
  • Lenders use this to determine your ability to manage payments
  • Total monthly debt payment/monthly gross income
  • 43% is generally the maximum for a Qualified Mortgage as per Consumer Finance
  1. Review your Retirement Allocations
  • Does it make sense?
  • Is it balanced?
  • Are you earning a return? 
  1. Check your credit score – It is your Financial Reputation
  • Obtain your free annual credit report from each of the 3 major reporting agencies, check it for accuracy, and dispute anything that is not correct
  • Obtain your FICO score

Taking the time to manage our money provides benefits:

  • Feeling in control
  • Knowing our capacity to absorb financial shocks
  • Finding if we are on track to meet our financial goals or
  • Having peace of mind and the flexibility to make choices

The road to financial freedom is full of potholes. If you take the time to discover, find, and fix them, your trip will be less eventful and you will reach your destination faster & safer.

May you have a safe, prosperous, and fulfilling journey.

Thanks for the reading!

Deb

P.S. I welcome and encourage comments and questions. It is one way to see how I am doing. 

Deborah Ann Fox, CPA is working to make a difference in peoples lives by helping them build and protect their financial health. She offers free 30 minute, no obligation consultations and is available for appointments – including remote. More information is available at http://www.DeborahFoxCPA.com. Questions or comments can be sent to debfoxfinancial@gmail.com.

Financial Fitness: Improving your Tax Story

2013 Tax

Our tax returns tell a story.

A Tax Return is the Story of your recent Past; it is your 2015 financial story.

The story tells the reader lots of information about you:

  • Marital Status (tax rate) Single; Head of Household; Married filing Separate; Married filing Joint; Widowed
  • How you earn your money – employee, self-employed, real-estate investments/rents; royalties
  • How you support yourself if you are not working – unemployment, retired, pension, social security, Required Minimum Distributions
  • How you spent your money: mortgage interest; children; student loans; medical bills; charitable donations
  • Did you have a good year with gambling winnings? Capital Gains?
  • Did you have financially devastating year, as many unfortunately did this year, because of so many natural U.S. catastrophes in 2015?

 

Income Tax Planning is one of the best ways to build your financial wealth.

2015:

Yes, 2015 is over and there is limited opportunity to improve that tax bill. However, depending on your circumstances, there might still be a way to reduce the amount you pay.

  • Contribute to your IRA before 4/18/16
  • If you are married, can you start and fund a Spousal IRA?
  • For 2015 and 2016, your total contributions to all of your traditional and Roth IRAs cannot be more than:

$5,500 ($6,500 if you’re age 50 or older), or your taxable compensation for the year, if your compensation was less than this dollar limit

Your Traditional IRA contributions may be tax-deductible. The deduction may be limited if you or your spouse is covered by a retirement plan at work and your income exceeds certain levels.

 

Be Careful of Excess IRA Contributions:

If you exceed the 2015 IRA contribution limit, you may withdraw excess contributions from your account by the due date of your tax return (including extensions). Otherwise, you must pay a 6% tax each year on the excess amounts left in your account

Note that Employer contributions made under a SEP (Simplified Employee Pension) plan do not affect the amount you can contribute to an IRA on your own behalf.  You can both receive employer contributions to a SEP-IRA and make regular, annual contributions to a traditional or Roth IRA.

2016:

Our Financial Life is not stagnant. Like the ocean or a river, it changes all the time – it is a continuous evolving, moving, financial puzzle. New life stages & events provide us an opportunity to make new financial decisions & implement a revised plan.

The key to changing your Tax Story requires you to take action, now, in the present, and in the future.

Here are some tips to help you strengthen your Financial Fitness in this New Year:

  1. If you are an employee, review your withholding allowance on Form W-4. Is it accurate for what you anticipate in 2016? If not adjust, as soon as possible. The earlier you do this during the year, the more accurate your withholding will be.
  1. If you are Self-Employed, even part-time, do you know if you are required to make estimated quarterly payments to the IRS?  Avoid penalties & interest by ensuring that you make the required payments if they apply. Independent Contractors, Freelance workers, those that conduct Internet based sales (Etsy, eBay, Airbnb) and even Uber Drivers should review the information on the IRS website.

The IRS expects you to pay tax as the money is earned. If you operate on a calendar year, due dates are 4/15, 6/15, 9/15, and 1/15 for the previous year.

  1. If you have a High Deductible Health Insurance Plan, consider setting up a Health Savings Account (HSA). This is a tax- advantaged account to help pay for your medical expenses.

It is also an “Above the Line” deduction on your 1040 Individual tax return, which means you can use it to reduce your income, even if you do not itemize. Lower income, generally indicates, lower taxes.

  1. If you gamble, including playing the lottery, save all of your 2016 “expense” receipts. Why? If you win big, you can reduce the amount you won by the amount that you lost and only pay tax on the difference.

Gambling income includes but is not limited to winnings from lotteries, raffles, horse races, and casinos. It includes cash winnings and the fair market value of prizes, such as cars and trips.

To deduct your losses, you must be able to provide receipts, tickets, statements, or other records that show the amount of both your winnings and losses

  1. Defer at least some of your income through a 401K match or similar program to reduce your taxable income for the year & to build savings for the future.
  1. If you itemize or might be able to itemize, record all of the miles you drive, by category: Charity ($0.14); Medical/Moving ($0.19) and Business ($0.54).

It can all add up, faster than you might think and may also make the difference between claiming the standard deduction and being able to itemize. The more you can legally write off, the lower your tax bill.

You can keep a paper calendar in your car & record what, where, why, & how many miles for each trip or use a Smart Phone App to help you.

Whatever you do, ensure you keep good records. If you are audited & can’t prove the deduction, the deduction can be denied and you could owe a penalty and interest for the underpayment.

  1. If you have a business and operate on a cash basis, it is imperative that you keep great records for both cash coming in & cash going out. This recent article highlights the reason why you need to do this: http://smallbiztrends.com/2015/12/recent-irs-case-highlights-need-sophisticated-small-business-management.html

 

  1. Think like a Tax Professional: Know your “Income” Types & their Tax Rates:

Taxable “Income”:

  • Ordinary Income is income earned from providing services or the sales of goods
  • Capital gains are usually associated with the sale or exchange of property characterized as capital assets
  • Short Term Capital Gains are taxed at your Ordinary Income tax rate (10 % to 39.6%)
  • Long Term Capital-Gains tax rates vary by your income tax bracket and the type asset sold
  • Generally, if you’re in the 10% or 15% tax bracket, you’ll pay 0% on those gains. Most other taxpayers pay 15%; however, the rate can also be 20, 25, or 28% for certain asset classes and/or income levels.

Tax Deferred Investment Income includes:

Withdrawals from Traditional IRAs and your 401K, which are, taxed as ordinary income (10% to 39.6%)

Tax Free Investment Income: Roth IRA

  • Tax Free Income as long as the account has been open for at least 5 years
  • Provides flexibility in the timing of future income – you decide
  • Required Minimum Distributions do not apply to Roth accounts as are required by Traditional IRA plans
  • Roth IRA distributions are not considered as income when determining how your Social Security payments are taxed. Qualified Roth distributions are not included in either net investment income or in the modified adjusted gross income calculation for assessing the 3.8% net investment income tax

 

  1. Manage your Tax Bracket:
  • Try to keep your Ordinary Income in the lower tax brackets
  • “Fill up” each bracket, where possible
  • Be aware of tax consequences before making decisions that push you into the next highest rate bracket; i.e. can you defer a bonus or sale to new year if it means you will be taxed 10% less?
  • If you itemize, group deductions where possible; i.e. elective medical or dental procedures; charitable contributions to reduce your taxable income – Plan

 

  1. Your income tax bill is perhaps the biggest bill you will pay over your lifetime. Learn, Plan, Act to reduce and keep more of your money in your pocket, not Theirs (The IRS).

Yes,  to be in compliance, we need to file & pay.  The IRS rules are there for us to use. It is our responsibility and our choice to use them or not. The IRS is not going to tell you, you could have paid less, if you had just (xxx). There are a lot of possible ways to “fill in the blank”. Each Tax Story is unique.

As a CPA – Tax Advisor, I love learning the rules and then sharing information to help other people reduce their tax bills. It is my way to help empower other people and hopefully, make a small difference in their quality of life. Nobody likes paying taxes; almost all of us like to save money.

Have fun leaning, planning, and saving.

Cheers to a happier, healthier, & wealthier 2016!

Thanks for reading,

Deb

 

 

Deborah Ann Fox, CPA is working to make a difference in peoples lives, hearts, and wallets by helping others protect their financial health and is available for side-by-side, remote, or mobile appointments. More information is available at http://www.debfoxfinancial.com. Questions or comments can be sent to debfoxfinancial@gmail.com

“Money on the Table”- 2015 Year-End Tax Saving Strategies

Leaving “Money on the Table” is an idiom, which means not getting as much money as you could.

You can do this in a lot of different ways such as salary negotiations, selling low when you bought high, or by not using the IRS tax rules and planning opportunities and then leave your hard earned money “on the table”.

The IRS, literally, spells “theirs”. The money is theirs if you just wait until the tax- filing season comes, complete & submit your 1040 tax form and then pay the amount owed or get a refund.

As a CPA – Tax Advisor, I love learning the rules and then sharing information to help other people reduce their tax bills. It is my way to help empower other people and hopefully, make a small difference in their quality of life. Nobody likes paying taxes; almost all of us like to save money.

Yes, we need to pay our share, but we don’t need to pay more than we need to. The IRS also does not want us to pay more than we should. The rules are in place to help us pay less. It is our responsibility and our choice to use them or not. The IRS is not going to tell you, you could have paid less, if you had just (xxx). There are a lot of possible ways to “fill in the blank”. Each tax story is unique.

As an advocate for “not leaving money on the table”, I offer you some practical, actionable, steps to take now to see if you can reduce your 2015 tax bill, now, before it is too late.

Step One: Estimate your 2015 Income & IRS Withholding

If you want to want to make sure your money is more in “your pocket” than theirs:
• Determine how much you have earned this year
• Determine what you have paid toward your 2015 tax bill
• Then increase each of these amounts to estimate the year-end amounts

Step Two: Compare this year to last year:

Now that you have a glimpse of your 2015 tax situation, compare those numbers to those on your 2014 tax return. A filed return can be used as a sort of “road map” to see if there are options to reduce your tax bill now or in the future.

For example, did you get a refund last year? If so, consider this:

Last year, Kiplinger’s had a great article titled, “Safeguard your Refund by shrinking it”. The article includes the following:
• More than 75% of Americans get an IRS tax refund each year which is the equivalent of giving the IRS an interest free loan
• Identity Theft is on the rise and thieves file fraudulent returns to collect refunds. Avoid this risk by limiting the amount of refund you receive
• Use on –line tax calculators to see if your estimated tax withholding is correct; the IRS and Kiplinger’s both provide these tools
• File a revised W-4 with your employer this year to change your tax withholdings; remember the goal is to break even

Step Three: Review 2015 & determine actionable steps

Shift “Income” to this year or to next year?

Consider if you can shift your income to decrease the amount of tax owed.

If you think your income will decrease next year and your tax rate would be lower, can you:
1. Defer a year-end bonus to January 2016?
2. Postpone a sale that will trigger a gain to next year?
3. Delay exercising stock options?

Alternatively, it may make sense to move income to this year:
1. Covert a traditional IRA into a Roth IRA and recognize the conversion income this year?
2. Take IRA distributions this year?

Shift Payments?
If you itemize, would you benefit if you changed the timing of some of your payments?
If you expect your income to decrease next year, then you might want to move some payments/deductions to the current year to offset your higher income this year. Can you:
• Prepay property taxes?
• Make your January mortgage payment this year?
• If you owe state income taxes, consider making up any shortfall rather than waiting until your return is due
• Consider the timing of medical expenses so you can benefit from the deduction?
• Sell some or all of your loss stocks?
• If you qualify for a health savings account, consider setting one up and making the maximum contribution allowable

Defer Deductions to 2016
If you expect tax rates to increase next year, or if you anticipate a substantial increase in taxable income, you may want to explore waiting to take deductions until 2016:
• Postpone year-end charitable contributions, property tax payments, and medical & dental expense payments, to the extent you might get a deduction for such payments
• Postpone the sale of any loss-generating property

Step Four: Can you do anything else?
For those that would like to take it a step further, consider if there is anything you can do to increase your “Above the Line Deductions”.

On a Federal Individual 1040 tax form, the basic formula is:
Income minus “Above the Line” deductions = Adjusted Gross Income.

These deductions include paying monies to:
• Establish an IRA for you or your spouse?
• If qualified, set up a Health Savings Account?
• If self-employed, would you benefit from having health insurance or a Qualified Pension Plan?

While this is not an exhaustive list, I hope it gives you enough information to initiate your plan, act this year, and save money on your 2015 next tax bill.

A dollar saved is a dollar you don’t need to earn. Keep marching towards financial freedom. Happy planning!

Deb Fox is working to make a difference in peoples lives, hearts, and wallets by helping others protect their financial health and is available for side-by-side, remote, or mobile appointments. More information is available at http://www.debfoxfinancial.com. Questions or comments can be sent to debfoxfinancial@gmail.com

SBW2015: Showing Gratitude for all Small Business Owners

Risk

America is celebrating National Small Business Week all over the country & special events will be held May 4 – May 8, 2015 in cities across the United States & via the web. It is a time that we as consumers can show our appreciation for local business by shopping locally & promoting them by sharing their information with others.

As a small business owner myself, I also thought it would be fun to share a few financial tips that may be helpful to other small business owners. It is another small way to say thank you & show support to my community.

Take Time to Work On Your Business & Not Just In It:
• Financial Statements & Tax Returns both tell a financial story & can be used as a road map or a compass to help guide profitability
• On at least a quarterly basis, Compare your Budgeted/Forecasted Amounts to Actual Results to identity differences (variance)
• Try to determine why there was a difference, if any, & adjust as necessary
• Also compare Year to Year Actual Results – where is your value being created & lost?

Watch The Bottom Line by Protecting your Assets & Managing your Risk:
• On 10/1/15, the financial responsibility (liability) starts to shift for fraudulent transactions to U.S. merchants if they have not upgraded their payment systems to accept EMV Chip Payment Cards. This is true if the card issuing company has added the chip to their card & you have not upgraded your POS system. Rules vary by issuing card companies & products sold. More information can be found from http://www.darkreading.com at : http://t.co/1OqiwTLY0P
• Know your Net Worth & make a conscious decision about how much of it you want to protect by buying insurance & how much you want to “self-insure”

Try Not to Leave Money on the Table:
• Avoid financial pitfalls, fines, & penalties by knowing & applying FLSA laws correctly including classifying Exempt, Non-Exempt, & Independent Contractors & treat them & pay them correctly
• Use the tax laws to strategically plan your business operations to minimize tax expense & keep more money “in your pocket”

Deborah Ann Fox, CPA helps individuals & small business owners build & protect their financial wealth. She is available for in-person, or remote appointments. See http://www.debfoxfinancial.com for more information.

Part 2: Financial Success : Our Kids: Money, Its Value & Values

piggy

Teaching kids about money, its value, & values can be frequently connected to each other.

Kids learn when they are young that money is something we trade for something else.

Teaching kids “value” is also something we can introduce to them when they are young.

How many times as parents, have we heard, “Mom/Dad, will you buy this for me?” We tell them, no, but you can spend your own money to buy it and then they decide they don’t want it. As the parent, you might think, I sure am glad I did not spend my money on something they don’t really want. I know I did & was glad that I had responded the way that I had.

Yes, the kids thought they wanted “it” & they did, when they did not have to pay for it. The “value” changed when they needed to spend their own money. Kids begin to learn that “value is what we think something is worth”. If we buy it, they don’t have to think about it. If they buy it, the value or the cost becomes a reality. Kids can become “pretty tight fisted” when it comes to spending their own money & that is a good thing.

Indirectly, they are also learning “relative value”. Yes, I want that, but I want something else more. Slowly, they begin to learn delayed gratification, priorities, & the need to save their money for what they want or think they need.

Kids often think that they need a certain brand of clothes or perhaps shoes & there are a lot of reasons for them to think this way. As parents, we can choose to re-enforce this belief or use it as a springboard for education. Yes, they might need a new pair of jeans or shoes, but you could set a dollar limit on what they can spend. If you want to spend $60 for that item & they want something more expensive, tell them they can earn the difference & you will give them the $60 when they have enough money to pay for it, Until then, they wait or can have the $60 item.

Teach your kids to count & also teach them what counts
• Tell your kids that advertisements are designed to try to get people to buy things
• Educate them that retailers place “impulse items” at the check out in the hope that you will decide to buy it while you were waiting in line
• Teach them to comparison shop: buy the store brand or the name brand? What is the difference in cost? Let them know that sometimes you can taste the difference, but most of the time you cannot. Why spend more money on something you can’t even taste?

Perspective on our possessions can help us learn about value as we develop our values:
• When my son, Jason, was in 9th grade he tutored Hispanic children in the Colonia’s outside of McAllen, TX. Most of the children’s parents only spoke Spanish & lacked education to help their children with their homework. Jason tutored one day a week for the school year & grew to be more thankful for what he had. After his 1st visit, he told me he was glad to even have a pair of shoes. Serving others that had so much less, made his heart more sensitive to other people – less judgmental, more caring. Of course a boy is not going to tell you that, but I could see it in his actions. For example, when he was older, he & a friend bought pizzas & served them to the homeless, who were living under the bridges in Houston.
• Learning to appreciate what we have helps us value our possessions; it subtly teaches perspective & gratitude

Build their self-esteem. Become an advocate & a role model to show them “who you are is more important than what you own”
• Share good examples of living “beneath your means” – tell them Warren Buffet is one of the richest people in the world & he is well known for being “frugal” with his money
• Tell them that even though Warren is worth billions, he still lives in the same house he bought before he had very much money
• Let them know there is a big difference between what you make, what you have, & what you keep
• To have money, we need to learn how to earn it, how to spend it, how to keep it, and how we try to make more money by saving & investing

    Marty Rubin said, “A scale can tell what a body weighs, but not its value.” Like wise, our value comes from within – not outside of ourselves.

Thanks for reading,
Deb

Deborah Ann Fox, CPA uses her “money” knowledge to help families & small business with budgeting, homeownership/debt, tax planning (saving), cash management, etc. She is available for side-by-side, local, & remote appointments. She offers free 30-minute consultations.

http://www.debfoxfinancial.com

Financial Success: Life Lessons for all Ages & Stages – Part 1

 Featured Image -- 373

To celebrate the beginning of April’s Financial Literacy month, I thought I would create a series of blogs about money & financial literacy. I am starting at the beginning, when kids are young & will continue through some of the older ages & stages of life.

Part 1: Kids learn by what they see, hear, & do:

 When my niece, Ali, was 4, she used to think money came out of a machine. It made sense, she saw her Mom do it. If you want something, you just go to the machine, get the money, & go to the store. If we don’t tell them any different, kids believe what they see – money comes from a machine.

Little ones quickly learn that they need money to buy things. They need to be taught:

  • You earn money by working
  • You deposit the money you earn in a bank to keep it safe
  • You have to have money to pay for things you need – a place to sleep, food to eat, clothes to wear, maybe, even a car to go places
  • You use money you saved in the bank to pay for things you need
  • There is a difference between needs & wants – needs come 1st
  • You usually have to save money to buy something you want

Kids learn from what they hear. Do you speak positively or negatively about money?

Most of us know that kids are like little sponges & pick up on things they hear & sometimes they repeat us to our surprise (or shock): “We don’t answer the phone at our house, it might be a bill collector”. As adults, we need to be careful with our words. We also need to pay attention to other places that kids can learn by listening – TV, video games, radio, private & public places.

In today’s digital world there are so many ways to educate our kids about money; we can play fun songs for them to hear and maybe learn. One of my favorites is Sammy Rabbit; hIs dream big campaign teaches great money habits for young children. You can learn more about Sammy at http://www.dreambigday.net or sammyrabbit.com.

Kids also learn by what they do. Teaching kids to be financially successful in life should begin early. The Davidson Institute reports that money behavior habits can be formed by age 7.   When we are young, it is hard to learn that we can’t have everything we want. Parents can help by creating incentives & providing rewards.

  • Have kids write goals & create visual savings charts for something “they want”
  • Tell them that writing goals down increases their chance of success
  • Practice “learning by doing”
  • Money earned or received can be divided into 3 groups – spend, save, give. Let them decide where to give.
  • Teach “delayed gratification” – this will provide a great leap forward to becoming financially capable & successful, later in life
  • The concept of “budget” can be taught with things other than money; i.e. 1 sugary item per day – they choose when. I used to tell my son, Jason, if you want sugar on your cereal in the morning, then please don’t ask for a cookie or something else later on in the day. He frequently decided to wait because he did not know what other choices there might be later. Till this day, he still does not care for sugar much and he learned to wait for what he wants. He also works for it.

If you want to teach your kids a little about saving money, tell them that one of the best things they can do with their money, is to save it. Start early & save often. Even a little bit saved, on a regular basis, can add up to much after time. It is like planting a seed and watching it grow. Money can do the same.

A Chinese Proverb is “Learning is a treasure that will follows its owner everywhere”. Learning to make smart financial decisions when you are young will also benefit you for life.

Have fun teaching & helping others learn to make smart financial decisions. Thanks for reading.

Deborah Ann Fox, CPA is a financial literacy advocate who devotes part of her practice to helping others make smart financial decisions by providing education while building client skill levels.  She is available for one on one, local, or remote appointments. Free 30 minute consultations.

website: http://www.debfoxfinancial.com

Phone: 619-549-2717