Financial Health: 8 Ways to Check

8 Ways to Check and/or Protect your Financial Health

Many of us see the doctor for an annual check-up.

Probably, even more of us have our car checked on a routine basis.

Few of us take a holistic view of our financial health, particularly, on a routine basis.

I encourage you to be an early adopter, change this, and become proactive with your financial health.

For our physical health, our doctor might check our weight, blood pressure/pulse, LDL/HDL and then compares the findings to our initial baseline results.

For our financial health, we should also establish a baseline /benchmark and then, periodically compare our results to our previous records,

How are we going to know how we are doing unless we take the time to look?

How are we going to tell if we are getting better if we don’t have an initial baseline to compare to?

The factors that you choose to use are up to you. My list includes possibilities for you to consider. Record your answers & date it. Some responses will result in a number, others will be a yes/no and perhaps initiate a new thought process. Here are my suggestions: 

  1. Determine your Personal Net Worth
  • Create a Balance Sheet: Assets = Liabilities & Equity
  • Assets are the value of what you own; liabilities are what you owe
  • Assets – Liabilities = Equity in a business or your personal Net Worth
  1. Review the Liability limits on your insurance policies (Homeowners, Renters, Auto, Business). Is the limit high enough to protect your Net Worth if something serious happened? You don’t want to leave your “assets” (money) exposed to risk of loss without making the conscious decision to do so.
  1. Cash Flow- Positive or Negative?
  • Money coming in, money going out, and when?
  • Is it steady through out the year or does it fluctuate?
  • Are you spending more than you bring in?
  1. Liquidity – Emergency Fund +
  • Emergency Fund savings for 3-6 months of living expenses?
  • Any other “reserves” you keep – Christmas or vacation fund?
  1. Your Personal Savings rate
  • Do you try to pay yourself first?
  • Are “you” built into your required monthly expenses?
  • Do you fully participate in your company’s matching program?
  1. Determine your Debt/Income Ratio
  • Lenders use this to determine your ability to manage payments
  • Total monthly debt payment/monthly gross income
  • 43% is generally the maximum for a Qualified Mortgage as per Consumer Finance
  1. Review your Retirement Allocations
  • Does it make sense?
  • Is it balanced?
  • Are you earning a return? 
  1. Check your credit score – It is your Financial Reputation
  • Obtain your free annual credit report from each of the 3 major reporting agencies, check it for accuracy, and dispute anything that is not correct
  • Obtain your FICO score

Taking the time to manage our money provides benefits:

  • Feeling in control
  • Knowing our capacity to absorb financial shocks
  • Finding if we are on track to meet our financial goals or
  • Having peace of mind and the flexibility to make choices

The road to financial freedom is full of potholes. If you take the time to discover, find, and fix them, your trip will be less eventful and you will reach your destination faster & safer.

May you have a safe, prosperous, and fulfilling journey.

Thanks for the reading!

Deb

P.S. I welcome and encourage comments and questions. It is one way to see how I am doing. 

Deborah Ann Fox, CPA is working to make a difference in peoples lives by helping them build and protect their financial health. She offers free 30 minute, no obligation consultations and is available for appointments – including remote. More information is available at http://www.DeborahFoxCPA.com. Questions or comments can be sent to debfoxfinancial@gmail.com.

Part 2: Financial Success : Our Kids: Money, Its Value & Values

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Teaching kids about money, its value, & values can be frequently connected to each other.

Kids learn when they are young that money is something we trade for something else.

Teaching kids “value” is also something we can introduce to them when they are young.

How many times as parents, have we heard, “Mom/Dad, will you buy this for me?” We tell them, no, but you can spend your own money to buy it and then they decide they don’t want it. As the parent, you might think, I sure am glad I did not spend my money on something they don’t really want. I know I did & was glad that I had responded the way that I had.

Yes, the kids thought they wanted “it” & they did, when they did not have to pay for it. The “value” changed when they needed to spend their own money. Kids begin to learn that “value is what we think something is worth”. If we buy it, they don’t have to think about it. If they buy it, the value or the cost becomes a reality. Kids can become “pretty tight fisted” when it comes to spending their own money & that is a good thing.

Indirectly, they are also learning “relative value”. Yes, I want that, but I want something else more. Slowly, they begin to learn delayed gratification, priorities, & the need to save their money for what they want or think they need.

Kids often think that they need a certain brand of clothes or perhaps shoes & there are a lot of reasons for them to think this way. As parents, we can choose to re-enforce this belief or use it as a springboard for education. Yes, they might need a new pair of jeans or shoes, but you could set a dollar limit on what they can spend. If you want to spend $60 for that item & they want something more expensive, tell them they can earn the difference & you will give them the $60 when they have enough money to pay for it, Until then, they wait or can have the $60 item.

Teach your kids to count & also teach them what counts
• Tell your kids that advertisements are designed to try to get people to buy things
• Educate them that retailers place “impulse items” at the check out in the hope that you will decide to buy it while you were waiting in line
• Teach them to comparison shop: buy the store brand or the name brand? What is the difference in cost? Let them know that sometimes you can taste the difference, but most of the time you cannot. Why spend more money on something you can’t even taste?

Perspective on our possessions can help us learn about value as we develop our values:
• When my son, Jason, was in 9th grade he tutored Hispanic children in the Colonia’s outside of McAllen, TX. Most of the children’s parents only spoke Spanish & lacked education to help their children with their homework. Jason tutored one day a week for the school year & grew to be more thankful for what he had. After his 1st visit, he told me he was glad to even have a pair of shoes. Serving others that had so much less, made his heart more sensitive to other people – less judgmental, more caring. Of course a boy is not going to tell you that, but I could see it in his actions. For example, when he was older, he & a friend bought pizzas & served them to the homeless, who were living under the bridges in Houston.
• Learning to appreciate what we have helps us value our possessions; it subtly teaches perspective & gratitude

Build their self-esteem. Become an advocate & a role model to show them “who you are is more important than what you own”
• Share good examples of living “beneath your means” – tell them Warren Buffet is one of the richest people in the world & he is well known for being “frugal” with his money
• Tell them that even though Warren is worth billions, he still lives in the same house he bought before he had very much money
• Let them know there is a big difference between what you make, what you have, & what you keep
• To have money, we need to learn how to earn it, how to spend it, how to keep it, and how we try to make more money by saving & investing

    Marty Rubin said, “A scale can tell what a body weighs, but not its value.” Like wise, our value comes from within – not outside of ourselves.

Thanks for reading,
Deb

Deborah Ann Fox, CPA uses her “money” knowledge to help families & small business with budgeting, homeownership/debt, tax planning (saving), cash management, etc. She is available for side-by-side, local, & remote appointments. She offers free 30-minute consultations.

http://www.debfoxfinancial.com

Financial Success: Life Lessons for all Ages & Stages – Part 1

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To celebrate the beginning of April’s Financial Literacy month, I thought I would create a series of blogs about money & financial literacy. I am starting at the beginning, when kids are young & will continue through some of the older ages & stages of life.

Part 1: Kids learn by what they see, hear, & do:

 When my niece, Ali, was 4, she used to think money came out of a machine. It made sense, she saw her Mom do it. If you want something, you just go to the machine, get the money, & go to the store. If we don’t tell them any different, kids believe what they see – money comes from a machine.

Little ones quickly learn that they need money to buy things. They need to be taught:

  • You earn money by working
  • You deposit the money you earn in a bank to keep it safe
  • You have to have money to pay for things you need – a place to sleep, food to eat, clothes to wear, maybe, even a car to go places
  • You use money you saved in the bank to pay for things you need
  • There is a difference between needs & wants – needs come 1st
  • You usually have to save money to buy something you want

Kids learn from what they hear. Do you speak positively or negatively about money?

Most of us know that kids are like little sponges & pick up on things they hear & sometimes they repeat us to our surprise (or shock): “We don’t answer the phone at our house, it might be a bill collector”. As adults, we need to be careful with our words. We also need to pay attention to other places that kids can learn by listening – TV, video games, radio, private & public places.

In today’s digital world there are so many ways to educate our kids about money; we can play fun songs for them to hear and maybe learn. One of my favorites is Sammy Rabbit; hIs dream big campaign teaches great money habits for young children. You can learn more about Sammy at http://www.dreambigday.net or sammyrabbit.com.

Kids also learn by what they do. Teaching kids to be financially successful in life should begin early. The Davidson Institute reports that money behavior habits can be formed by age 7.   When we are young, it is hard to learn that we can’t have everything we want. Parents can help by creating incentives & providing rewards.

  • Have kids write goals & create visual savings charts for something “they want”
  • Tell them that writing goals down increases their chance of success
  • Practice “learning by doing”
  • Money earned or received can be divided into 3 groups – spend, save, give. Let them decide where to give.
  • Teach “delayed gratification” – this will provide a great leap forward to becoming financially capable & successful, later in life
  • The concept of “budget” can be taught with things other than money; i.e. 1 sugary item per day – they choose when. I used to tell my son, Jason, if you want sugar on your cereal in the morning, then please don’t ask for a cookie or something else later on in the day. He frequently decided to wait because he did not know what other choices there might be later. Till this day, he still does not care for sugar much and he learned to wait for what he wants. He also works for it.

If you want to teach your kids a little about saving money, tell them that one of the best things they can do with their money, is to save it. Start early & save often. Even a little bit saved, on a regular basis, can add up to much after time. It is like planting a seed and watching it grow. Money can do the same.

A Chinese Proverb is “Learning is a treasure that will follows its owner everywhere”. Learning to make smart financial decisions when you are young will also benefit you for life.

Have fun teaching & helping others learn to make smart financial decisions. Thanks for reading.

Deborah Ann Fox, CPA is a financial literacy advocate who devotes part of her practice to helping others make smart financial decisions by providing education while building client skill levels.  She is available for one on one, local, or remote appointments. Free 30 minute consultations.

website: http://www.debfoxfinancial.com

Phone: 619-549-2717

Band-Aids for the Heart, Mind & Soul

Red Crossed BandaidsBand-Aids have been around since 1920. Earle Dickson created them for his wife who frequently cut & burned herself while cooking. This “healing aid” is an American Icon. We all know the brand and most of us use it. It is great for life’s little physical injuries.

There are a lot of ways we can feel “injured’ or “hurt”. Sometimes, we are physically hurt. A Band-Aid may be all we need. Healing is fast & easy. Psychological & Emotional “injuries” are more difficult to heal. Band-Aids for those “hurts” don’t come as easy. We have to do some work to get past the hurt. Fortunately, there are some “Tools” we can use to help our growth and healing process.

Zing Ziegler said, “Getting knocked down in life is a given. Getting up and moving forward is a choice”.

History is full of those that supposedly failed and then became a huge success. We can use their stories or our own success to help us keep moving & growing. It gives us hope. We can Turn Our Scars in to Stars and our Wounds in to Wisdom.

Our attitude affects our viewpoint. Will life’s events boost you up or keep you down? Will your childhood or some other event keep you stuck living in the wake of the boat or will you use life’s events to propel your boat forward?

Life is not a straight line. It is a zigzag, always full of ups & downs. There is rain and then the rainbows.

Christmas is a time of hope. We hope for a happy holiday season. We hope for a happy & healthy tomorrow. Most of us hope for a New Year as good or better than we had this year.

Hope is wonderful; sometimes it is all we have as we try to hold on. Hope by itself, is not a good long-term financial or life strategy. We need more. We need to:

  • Accept what is
  • Decide to make a change
  • Act

With this in mind, I offer you my top 12 “Band-Aids “ for psychological & emotional health and wellbeing:

1. Realize that Circumstances happen to us; they do not define who we are, unless we let them:

  • Experience is part of our history and/or background; It is not who we really are
  • We are more than what has happened to us. We can carry “our story” as a burden or use it as springboard for growth
  • Use it as a Spring Board

2. We only “fail” if we stop trying:

  • Everything else can be viewed as gaining the experience or the wisdom we need to move closer to our goal or toward our dreams
  • Keep Moving

3. Know that you can “Come Back” from a tough year, relationship or financial loss:

  • Learn to Let Go of things that weigh you down
  • You need energy to make goals happen. Let Go of a past that drains you
  • Choose to let go of the weight so you can create the energy you need to grow, in your business, or in your personal life

4. Remember & Celebrate Your Past Success:

  • If you overcame an adversity or a difficult situation in the past, you already know you can do it again
  • Do it
  • Celebrate your past success by remembering them. Write them down & use the list as a supportive reminder if you have a bad day
  • Gather wisdom from past challenges to create a better you today

5. Try to Avoid “Problem Pile-up”:

  • If you have more than 1 area that could use an emotional or psychological Band-Aid, it is hard or almost impossible to heal a lot of hurts at one time
  • We can’t fix things when there is a big pile
  • Choose the most important now, and work on that one topic
  • Then choose the next most important item; keep going

6. Decide to leave negative thoughts behind:

  • Ants are “Automatic Negative Thoughts
  • Thoughts & Feelings can be fleeting
  • We decide to hold on or let them go
  • Choose to let the “ANT’s” go rather than let them run wild
  • Try not to let your unconscious mind be the master of your life
  • Choose Differently

7. Fuel your thoughts with Positivity:

  • Choose to think that life is good and it will be
  • Where thoughts go, energy flows
  • We become what we think about
  • Think positive. Be positive. Act positive

8. Determine your SMART goal. Write it down. Your goal should be:

  • Specific
  • Measurable
  • Attainable
  • Relevant
  • Time-Bound

9. Measure & Monitor Your Success:

  • Document your success and date it
  • Ask yourself, are my actions consistent with my vision, goals, and dreams?
  • Tell yourself, if I fall short, it won’t because of my actions. Remember, actions speak louder than words.
  • If your goal seems too big, decide to Either Step Up or Lower your Goal
  • Baby steps, any forward steps, count too

10. Consider Practicing The Four Agreements:

  • Consciously choose to be impeccable with your word, thoughts, & deeds – with yourself and with others
  • Avoid making assumptions
  • Avoid taking things personal
  • Always do your best

11. Though we might walk “through the valley of the darkness,” we are not supposed to “Camp There”:

  • Just like in life, a one -sized Band-Aid does not fit all wounds
  • Little hurts heal faster than big hurts
  • Big hurts can take more time to heal
  • Be kind to self and give yourself time

12. Change Your Mind Movie:

  • Change the Unconscious “Mind Movie” (the stories we have told to ourselves) to the Consciousness “Mind Movie” (the healthy story you want to tell about yourself).
  • Create a “Vision Board” or “Dream Board
  • The new visual can be based on who you are now or who you want to be in the future
  • Use PowerPoint to create your own Mind Movie. Add your favorite motivational song. Watch and enjoy.

I hope some of my favorite tools help you or yours find a sense of internal peace, health, happiness, and wellbeing.

Conversations are welcomed and encouraged. Life is about heart.

You Count and I Care.

Deb Fox is working to make a difference in peoples lives, hearts, and wallets by helping others protect their financial health and is available for side-by-side, remote, or mobile appointment. More information is available at www.debfoxfinancial.com. Questions or comments can be sent to debfoxfinancial@gmail.com. Thanks for reading

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Milestones & Mountains – the LGBT “Financial Playing” Field

In Honor of the 40th anniversary of the San Diego Pride Festival this weekend, I offer an update about “Financial Equality” for the LGBT community, with whom I celebrate the financial victories that have been achieved since we celebrated this festival last year. 

Last year, we had 2 huge U.S. Supreme Court 6/26/13 decisions to celebrate:

  1. The Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA), section 3, was declared unconstitutional
  2. Proposition 8 defenders lacked “standing” which cleared the way for Legal Gay Marriage in CA

We also celebrated because Same-Sex Marriages (SSM) had just been allowed to resume again after a long break between 11/5/2008 through 6/27/2013.

This year, we have many reasons to celebrate, let’s call them “milestones achieved”.

We still have some mountains left to climb before the SSM “playing field” matches the “playing field “ of married opposite-sex couples.

Perspective:

The right to SSM is important for many reasons. For example, Wells Fargo issued a study in June 2014, in which the top 3 rights and benefits were listed for those surveyed:

  • Healthcare decision making rights 61%
  • Insurance and healthcare coverage 58%
  • Inheritance rights 56%

Health care decision-making can affect the quality of life. Insurance, healthcare coverage, and inheritance rights, all have a significant effect on the “financial equality” of life.

These rights and many others are becoming available to those that can legally marry their same-sex partner.  T

Today, SSM rights and benefits look more like a patch-work quilt across the United States as compared to those enjoyed by opposite –sex married couples who begin to enjoy their benefits, often as soon as they say, “I do”.

There has been tremendous progress and numerous changes since we celebrated San Diego Pride last year. Milestones to celebrate now include:

Same-Sex Marriage is fast becoming a reality for more people:

  • 19 states & the District of Columbia have Legal Same-Sex Marriage and 31 states have Same-Sex Marriage Bans
  • 12 states have had gay marriage bans overturned and appeals are in progress
  • 8/29/13 All Legal Same- Sex Marriages will be recognized for federal tax purposes as per the U.S. Department of Treasury
  • 9/16/13 effective date for Revenue Ruling 2013-17 which reads: “that for federal tax purposes, the Service adopts a general rule recognizing a marriage for same-sex individuals that was validly entered into a in a state whose laws authorize the marriage of two individuals of the same-sex even if the married couple is domiciled in a state that does not recognize the validity of same-sex marriages.”
  1. This opened the door to file original returns, amended returns, and claims for credit or refund for any overpayment of tax, provided that the applicable limitations period was still open under section 6511
  2. Couples can “pick and chose”, by year, which return, if any, they chose to amend, as long as the window is still open. Big return? Amend. Owe? Skip it.
  3. The window to amend the 2010 return, generally, expired on 4/15/14
  4. The 2011 1040 return can be amended until 4/15/15
  5. The 2012 1040 return can be amended until 4/15/16

Earlier this week, I attended an IRS DOMA seminar, which was introduced to about 300 tax professionals as “DOMA is about money, it has nothing to do with sex”.

SSM, is partially about money. The Windsor  (DOMA) case was about inheritance rights between spouses.

  • Federal tax law allows a deceased spouse to leave their assets, including a home, to the other spouse, without incurring estate tax. The Estate Tax Rate is 40%.
  •  The DOMA ruling resulted in Windsor being owed an IRS refund of $363,053 for the estate tax she had paid

The Estate Tax is a tax on your right to transfer property at your death.

  • Beginning January 1, 2011, estates of decedents survived by a spouse may elect to pass any of the decedent’s unused exemption to the surviving spouse. This election is made on a timely filed estate tax return for the decedent with a surviving spouse
  • 6/20/14, the Social Security Administration issued guidelines on eligibility for spouse-based retirement and survivor benefits, Medicare, and SSI benefits
  • 7/16/2014, the Connecticut Supreme Court rules that a Lesbian Widow has legal rights that predate Marriage Equality in the state.

Mountains:

  • SSM couples are unable to receive Social Security Spousal Benefits if they were married in one of the states that allow same-sex marriage but live in a restrictive state (reference Bankrate Retirement Blog 7/1/14)
  • Veterans benefits also are restricted for those living in states that do not allow same sex marriage (same reference as above)
  • The right to inherit pension benefits could fall under the “it depends” category. A recent 6/2/14 article about the Bayer Corporation provides some insight
  • Family Medical Leave Act does not cover same-sex spouses. Some employers grant this right to their employees and kudos to them.
  • Nationwide, there is not a federal law against LGBT workplace discrimination. A bill to accomplish that goal, the Employment Non-Discrimination Act, passed the Senate last year but has not yet been taken up by the House

In closing, as an American, I believe that all American’s should have the same rights and protections, under federal law.  The financial “playing field” should be the same regardless of whom you love and where you live in the United States.

Discrimination should be something all citizens do not have to fear or endure.

My name is Deb Fox and I am the proud sister of two gay brothers and multiple LGBT friends. I am an advocate and an ally. I believe in equality and am trying to do my part to make a difference, here now, today, and tomorrow.

Deb Fox is working to make a difference in peoples lives, hearts, and wallets. Although she earned her CPA in 1997, she is not currently practicing as a CPA. She does use her knowledge to help others protect their financial health and is available for side-by-side, remote, or mobile appointments.

 

Creating Freedom – in honor of the 4th of July

In honor of our 4th of July holiday, I searched for the word freedom and then discovered a new word. Ataraxic and, playfully, I decided it is a “condition” that I want to “suffer” from. What does it mean? One simple definition is “freedom from worry”.  Can you imagine?

Worry, is something nobody likes to do and most people want to avoid. We know that worrying is a waste of time & energy. We also know that it does not get it us anywhere, kind of like expecting to move forward when we rock in a rocking chair.

Ok, so maybe, we try not to worry, but at best, we are at least sometimes pre-occupied with thoughts that concern us. We think about our financial situation, our health, our families, friends, and of our longevity.

In case you are wondering how this might fit with my goal of providing “financial wellness” please read on and let me explain.

Living longer gives us more of an opportunity to enjoy life. It also creates more of a financial risk. Will our money last as long as we do?

Regardless of our age, thinking about this is important. Planning and preparing is imperative. In fact, those that are younger, have the greatest opportunity to plan and prepare. Those that are a bit older are more limited, and yet would still benefit from reviewing the following:

Benchmark how much money you need when you “retire”:

  • How much do you need to live each year?
  • Generally, it is not safe to assume you will just spend less; i.e. health care costs can increase as we age and you may travel more

How are you going to pay for it?

  • Social Security?
  • Pension or Retirement Funds?
  • Savings or Investments?
  • Working Part-Time?

How many years does your money need to last?

  • The Social Security website has a calculator that you can use to estimate your longevity

Note that woman, in particular, might want to save more money than their typical male counterparts. Why?

  •  Statistics show, that woman, on average, are paid less than a man
  • Women might leave the job market to have children and thus can earn less, over their lifetime
  •  Earning less could result in a lower Social Security benefit

Let’s suppose that you decide that you want to continue working part-time until you reach your “Full Retirement Age” or even post-pone retirement until the maximum age of 70 when you must start drawing upon your Social Security Benefit. Doing this can pay big dividends, in the form of increased monthly payments.

There is one big caveat to this plan and this, too, we can try and plan for. Generally, we must have our health to build wealth.

One of the greatest assets we have is the ability to produce an income. It has been said that our health is the new wealth. The ability to produce an income is part of our wealth.

We were all born with free will. As Americans, we have the liberty to pursuit our happiness and our freedom of choice. Planning today and saving for tomorrow creates more freedom of choice, in the long-term.

John Wayne said, “ Tomorrow hopes that we learned something from yesterday”.

I like to say, “Hope is not a good financial strategy. Plan, act, achieve and may you always have a reason to smile”.

Deb Fox is working to make a difference in peoples lives, hearts, and wallets. Although she earned her CPA in 1997, she is not currently practicing as a CPA. She does use her knowledge to help others protect their financial health and is available for side-by-side, remote, or mobile appointments.

 

What you don’t know can hurt you

RiskIgnorance may be bliss, but what you don’t know, can also hurt you.

You work hard for your money. You want to enjoy it, stretch it, and protect it.  Personal Risk Management is a way to protect your money. It is a systematic process of evaluating the chance of loss and then taking steps to combat the potential risk by practicing risk avoidance, using contractual indemnification, or by purchasing insurance.

One example of risk avoidance is if a sole-proprietor choses to incorporate and thus limits their personal liability exposure.

Contractual indemnification is a common clause in many contracts. Black’s Law Dictionary defines indemnity as a ““a duty to make good any loss, damage, or liability incurred by another.” Indemnity has a general meaning of holding one harmless; that is to say, that one party holds the other harmless for some loss or damage. Indemnification protects you against personal liability.

Insurance helps to stop an insured “loss” from being a financially life-changing event.

Most people probably find insurance boring and reading insurance contracts even more so. As a CPA, with the Associate in Risk Management (ARM) designation, I enjoy looking for the “devil in the details”. It is one way I provide value to others.

The goal of this blog is to plant some seeds of thought, initiate action, and provide you some “sleep insurance” because you took the time to evaluate, know, and feel comfortable with your financial position.  Factors to consider include:

Limits and Exposure:

  • Know what you have to protect:  What is your net worth; i.e. how much could you lose?
  • What type of losses are you covered for?
  • What percentage of your net-worth is protected by insurance and what amount is left “self-insured” in the event of a loss?

Property:

  • Do you know that if you do not buy the correct property insurance limit that you could be held financially responsible, for a portion of the loss? This is called the co-insurance requirement; read your policy
  • What does your insurance cover you for?
  • Do you have a property “named peril” or an “all-risk” policy? A Named Peril policy only provides coverage for the peril specifically named. An All Risk policy provides coverage for all losses not specifically excluded from coverage
  • If you do not have an All Risk policy, your fire policy might include “extended coverage”. Rev Shaw is an easy acronym to see what might be covered other than loss caused by a fire. R=Riot, E=explosion, V=Vehicle; S=smoke; H=hail; A=aircraft; W=Wind

Liability:

  • How do you determine the policy limit that you buy on your auto, homeowners, or Business Owners Policy? Do you buy the minimum limit or do you also have an Umbrella policy that responds in the event that a loss exceeds your primary limit?
  • In a Money magazine 2/5/14 article, Ed Charlebois of Travelers Insurance said “More than 80% of umbrella losses are auto-related,” If you remodel, does your general contractor make sure that the subcontractors are covered for worker’s compensation and general liability? Do you own a swimming pool, hot tub, or boat that increases your risk/exposure for a loss?
  • If you are a business owner, do your contracts require you to name others as an Additional Insured on your policy? Do you know that this means you are sharing your policy limit (s) with others? Is your defense coverage included in your policy limit?

Your insurance agent can help you review the type of coverage you buy. From a risk management perspective, insurance agents/brokers generally will not tell you how much insurance to buy; this increases their liability.  Likewise, I would not suggest limits either. I could, however, help you determine your exposed net worth and help you review how well you are covered from a property/casualty (liability) perspective.

Warren Buffet said, “Risk comes from not knowing what you are doing”.  Take the time to know and sleep well tonight.

Deb Fox is working to “make a difference in peoples lives, hearts, and wallets”. Although she earned her CPA designation in 1997, she is not currently practicing as a CPA. She does use her knowledge to help others protect their financial health and is available for side –by- side, remote, or mobile appointments.

Website: www.debfoxfinancial.com

E-mail: debfoxfinancial@gmail.com

Twitter: @debfoxfinancial