2013 Federal Tax Filing

tax2• Tax returns are due 4/15/14 – about 3 weeks from now
• You can extend the dead-line if you apply for an extension
• You cannot extend the time to pay the tax that you owe; this means you must estimate the amount owed to ensure you have paid in the correct amount, on time, to avoid interest and a possible penalty
• A penalty may be imposed if:

1. If the amount owed is at least $1,000 and it is more than 10% of the tax shown on your tax return
2. You did not pay enough estimated tax by any of the due dates. This is true even if you are owed a refund
3. There are exceptions; it is safer not to count on them or you can read about them in the Instructions for 1040


Filing Options:

• Do it yourselfers, with Adjusted Gross Income less than $58,000 can, generally, use the IRS Free File Program
• Hire A Professional – Someone that is educated, experienced, licensed (or in California, this includes being registered with CTEC –California Tax Education Council)

Food for thought:
• Typically, the Income Tax is the single biggest bill in an U.S. household. Understanding, planning, and using tax breaks, by year, can reduce your lifetime tax burden
• If you like to file your own taxes, sometimes it provides comfort to have a professional review your taxes to ensure accuracy or to use your tax return as a “road map” to see if there are options to lessen your tax bill – now or in the future
• From an IRS audit perspective, history has shown that Self-Employed people underestimate their income and overstate their deductions. Watch for these IRS audit redflags: http://www.Kiplinger.com/links/auditredflags

Things to think about for Same-Sex Married Couples:
• Same-Sex Married (SSM) couples can file their federal taxes together this year for the 1st time
• If it would benefit you, you can chose to amend any/all previous returns
• Dead-lines to amend previous returns are:
1. 4/15/14 to amend 2010
2. 4/15/15 to amend 2011
3. 4/15/16 to amend 2012

An investment in knowledge pays the best interest – Benjamin Franklin.
http://www.debfoxfinancial.com

Congratulations Same Sex Married couples; The IRS – Post DOMA – Ruling is effective 9-16-13

 

This recent IRS ruling could have a major impact upon your finances. Don’t be caught short by an unexpected surprise.

This recent IRS ruling could have a major impact upon your finances. Don’t be caught short by an unexpected surprise.

Effective Monday September 16, 2013 all Same Sex Married (SSM) couples can file their Federal tax return as either Married Filing Separate or Married Filing Joint.  Filing as single is no longer an option.

The change was announced in an 8/29/13 IRS Press Release:

  • All Same-Sex Married (SSM) couples must file as married even if they are living in a state that does not recognize their marriage
  • Couples can evaluate returns filed in 2010, 2011, and 2012 to see if amending their return results in an overpayment and money back to you
  • Amending returns is an option and is not required

From a tax standpoint, SSM couples have incurred a lot of financial change since the DOMA ruling.

The 2012 Federal Tax filing season is almost over and SSM couples were granted the right to file their Federal return as married on 8/29/13. How will this change affect you? Is there “money in the IRS Treasury bank” or do you need to put money in the bank to pay tax obligations that you just incurred?

To help you get started evaluating how all this change could affect you, create a chart similar to the following for each of the tax years that could be amended to see if filing an amended return for Married Filing Joint (MFJ) saves you money as a couple.

Specific rules are available for each year on the IRS website. It is important to pay attention to credits, deductions, and related phase out amounts. For example, for 2012

  • The $2,500 maximum deduction for interest paid on student loans begins to phase out for married taxpayers filing a joint return at $125,000 and phases out completely at $155,000

The following chart shows TP#1 using the Standard Deduction and TP#2 using the Itemized Deduction. Hypothetical dollar amounts are not included because they would not be relevant to you.

2012 –Filed:

Prior to DOMA

Taxpayer #1 Taxpayer #2 MFJ Amended after 9-16-13
Adjusted Gross Income
Standard Deduction $5950. $0.00
Itemized Deduction 0 ?
Personal Exemption $3800 $3800.
Taxable Income
Tax Due


To see what the 2013 tax year looks like for Married Filing Joint:

  • List your combined income and Federal Tax withheld or paid to date
  • Determine if you are going to use the Standard or Itemized Deduction
  • Use the IRS Withholding Calculator to check your withholding amount
  • File a new W-4 to adjust your holding if needed

The American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012 includes the following rules for 2013:

  • A new tax rate of 39.6% for individuals over $400,000 and $450,000 for Married Filing Joint
  • The Personal Exemption is $3900; this is phased out beginning with incomes of $250,000 and $300,000 for Married Fling Joint
  • Itemized Deductions are limited for Individuals over $250,000 and $300,000 for Married Fling Joint
  • The Alternative Minimum Tax Exemption is $51,900 ($80,000 for Married Fling Joint).

In closing, I understand that this is a lot of information to absorb, research, and evaluate to determine your financial situation.  Do-It –Yourselfers could be ready to go while others prefer to get help and spend their free time doing something enjoyable. Understandable. For now, just know that the IRS ruling could have a major impact upon your finances. Don’t be caught short by an unexpected surprise.

Benjamin Franklin said, “An investment in knowledge pays the best interest”.  May your investment produce a positive return for both your time and for your money.

Together in Love & Marriage – but not for U.S. Taxes?

Marriage and TaxesNote:

While today’s blog has an initial focus for those affected by the recent Supreme Courts DOMA decision, the tax implications discussed apply to all married couples that file their federal return as Married Filing Joint.

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Same-Sex Married Couples may have enjoyed life together for years, but 2013 will be the first U.S. tax year that these couples have to consider “filing married “. How will this affect their personal finances or even the their personal financial liability?

Perhaps, because filing married was never a possibility for filing Federal Taxes there was not a clear and driving need for discussion. Now there is.

Consider this quote from the Prudential LGBT Financial Experience 2012-2013 Research Study: “Same-Sex Couples value financial independence far more than the general population, often keeping separate accounts and financial plans.”

With the overturn of certain parts of DOMA (Defense of Marriage Act), it will be harder to keep money in the closet.

One of my personal goals is to help people make smart financial decisions and to avoid expensive mistakes. A good method for doing this is to look at both the risks and the rewards of each possible action.

This blog will focus on some of the risks for “filing married”. In my next blog, I will discuss the difference between Married Filing Joint (MFJ) and Married Filing Separate (MFS).

Married Filing Joint (MFJ) requires that both spouses sign the tax return. Note that doing so can result in the following as per the 2012 1040 U.S. Individual Tax Return Instructions:

Joint and several tax liability. If you file a joint return, both you and your spouse are generally responsible for the tax and interest or penalties due on the return. This means that if one spouse does not pay the tax due, the other may have to. Or, if one spouse does not report the correct tax, both spouses may be responsible for any additional taxes assessed by the IRS.

You may want to file separately if:

You believe your spouse is not reporting all of his or her income, or

You do not want to be responsible for any taxes due if your spouse does not have enough tax withheld or does not pay enough estimated tax.

Relief from joint responsibility:  In some cases, one spouse may be relieved of joint responsibility for tax, interest, and penalties on a joint return for items of the other spouse that were incorrectly reported on the joint return. You can ask for relief no matter how small the liability.

There are three types of relief available:

Innocent spouse relief

Separation of liability (available only to joint filers who are divorced, widowed, legally separated, or who have not lived together for the 12 months ending on the date the election for this relief is filed).

Equitable relief

You must file Form 8857, Request for Innocent Spouse Relief, to request relief from joint responsibility. Publication 971, Innocent Spouse Relief, explains the kinds of relief and who may qualify for them.

On August 8, 2013, The IRS issued REG-132251-11. This proposes to expand from two to 10 years the amount of time that taxpayers could apply for Innocent Spouse Relief so they are no longer responsible for the tax debts of estranged spouses.

In closing, I understand that the “Joint & Several Liability” may come as a surprise to many and it should. Many are newly married for U.S. tax purposes. I chose to share the “risks” first because it will help keep the “rewards” in perspective.

Defense of Marriage Act is Dead. Now What?

Credit: Getty Images

Credit: Getty Images / SAN FRANCISCO, CA – JUNE 28: Supporters applaud as same-sex couple Sandy Stier (2R) and Kris Perry (R) prepare to get married at San Francisco City Hall by California Attorney General Kamala Harris on June 28, 2013 in San Francisco, California.

My name is Deb Fox and I am a CPA and this is my first blog post. As a CPA I was aware of the financial inequalities created by the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) and I felt that it was wrong. I was elated to learn that the Supreme Court of the United States agreed with me.

I have the unusual blessing of having not one, but two gay brothers. One is my younger brother; he and his partner have been together for 13 years and they live in San Diego. The other is my older stepbrother; he and his partner have also been together for many years and live in Orlando, Florida.

Our parents are in their early 80’s and have been great role models for all of us. They have always been accepting of my brothers and their relationships. Our family is very close and we enjoy our time together as much as possible. We are fortunate to be blessed by loving and supportive relationships. This post is dedicated to my brothers and to all those that celebrate this victory with me.

A brief history of DOMA & a glimpse into what it means now for the 130,000 same-sex couples that are legally married living in the current 13 states and in the District of Columbia:

DOMA History:

  • In 1993, the Supreme Court of Hawaii, ruled that the state needed to show a “compelling state interest” in disallowing gays and lesbians from marrying
  • The case turned marriage into a possibility of obtaining the same rights of partnership as heterosexuals
  • In 1996 DOMA was signed into law, which restricted federal law from recognizing any unions between two persons who were not a man and a woman. The rule also said that no state had to accept any other states definition of marriage
  • On 6/26/13, the U.S. Supreme Court declared DOMA (section 3) unconstitutional .The federal government cannot discriminate against married lesbian and gay couples for the purposes of determining federal benefits and protections
  • States can still define marriage (section 2). The IRS will provide guidance about what happens if you are in a non-same sexed marriage recognition state

By striking down DOMA this now means that same-sex couples who are married in the 13 states and DC where same-sex marriage is legal are now “qualified” (spouse related) to receive:

Federal Benefits:

  • Receive Social Security, Medicare, & Disability Benefits
  • Receive Veterans & Military Benefits
  • Receive Cobra health insurance benefit continuation for your spouse
  • File Married Filing Joint or Married Filing Separate if you are married on 12/31/13

Employment Benefits:

  • Not be taxed by your employer for the health care benefits provided for your spouse
  • Take Family Medical Leave for your spouse
  • Receive wages and retirement plan benefits for deceased spouse

Gift/Estate Tax:

  • Make unlimited tax-free gifts to each other as long as the receiving spouse is a U.S. citizen
  • Leave your assets to your spouse without incurring estate taxes (Edie Windsor)

Congratulations to those that have been married for years & have not had the rights or the benefits as those heterosexual couples that obtained them when they spoke “I do”.

There is a lot to be considered with this recent decision by the Supreme Court which is why I have limited this initial post to the 2013 tax year. The IRS will soon let us know if we need to consider the tax implications retroactively – 3 years back or not.

But for now my friends, this is the time for you to:

  • Enjoy the 1,138 spousal benefits provided by the federal government – if you are in a same-sex marriage and living in a location that recognizes your marriage
  • Consider changing your W-4 from single to married.  You need to make sure that you are “withholding” enough to prevent being accessed a penalty
  • Know that the United States tax is a “pay as you go” tax system, which means that tax must be paid as you receive or earn your income. See IRS Topic 306 – Penalty for Underpayment of Estimated Tax
  • Celebrate – it is Pride week here in San Diego! Maybe, I will meet you there?

Happy Pride and Congratulations on a long fought battle.