Part 2: Financial Success : Our Kids: Money, Its Value & Values

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Teaching kids about money, its value, & values can be frequently connected to each other.

Kids learn when they are young that money is something we trade for something else.

Teaching kids “value” is also something we can introduce to them when they are young.

How many times as parents, have we heard, “Mom/Dad, will you buy this for me?” We tell them, no, but you can spend your own money to buy it and then they decide they don’t want it. As the parent, you might think, I sure am glad I did not spend my money on something they don’t really want. I know I did & was glad that I had responded the way that I had.

Yes, the kids thought they wanted “it” & they did, when they did not have to pay for it. The “value” changed when they needed to spend their own money. Kids begin to learn that “value is what we think something is worth”. If we buy it, they don’t have to think about it. If they buy it, the value or the cost becomes a reality. Kids can become “pretty tight fisted” when it comes to spending their own money & that is a good thing.

Indirectly, they are also learning “relative value”. Yes, I want that, but I want something else more. Slowly, they begin to learn delayed gratification, priorities, & the need to save their money for what they want or think they need.

Kids often think that they need a certain brand of clothes or perhaps shoes & there are a lot of reasons for them to think this way. As parents, we can choose to re-enforce this belief or use it as a springboard for education. Yes, they might need a new pair of jeans or shoes, but you could set a dollar limit on what they can spend. If you want to spend $60 for that item & they want something more expensive, tell them they can earn the difference & you will give them the $60 when they have enough money to pay for it, Until then, they wait or can have the $60 item.

Teach your kids to count & also teach them what counts
• Tell your kids that advertisements are designed to try to get people to buy things
• Educate them that retailers place “impulse items” at the check out in the hope that you will decide to buy it while you were waiting in line
• Teach them to comparison shop: buy the store brand or the name brand? What is the difference in cost? Let them know that sometimes you can taste the difference, but most of the time you cannot. Why spend more money on something you can’t even taste?

Perspective on our possessions can help us learn about value as we develop our values:
• When my son, Jason, was in 9th grade he tutored Hispanic children in the Colonia’s outside of McAllen, TX. Most of the children’s parents only spoke Spanish & lacked education to help their children with their homework. Jason tutored one day a week for the school year & grew to be more thankful for what he had. After his 1st visit, he told me he was glad to even have a pair of shoes. Serving others that had so much less, made his heart more sensitive to other people – less judgmental, more caring. Of course a boy is not going to tell you that, but I could see it in his actions. For example, when he was older, he & a friend bought pizzas & served them to the homeless, who were living under the bridges in Houston.
• Learning to appreciate what we have helps us value our possessions; it subtly teaches perspective & gratitude

Build their self-esteem. Become an advocate & a role model to show them “who you are is more important than what you own”
• Share good examples of living “beneath your means” – tell them Warren Buffet is one of the richest people in the world & he is well known for being “frugal” with his money
• Tell them that even though Warren is worth billions, he still lives in the same house he bought before he had very much money
• Let them know there is a big difference between what you make, what you have, & what you keep
• To have money, we need to learn how to earn it, how to spend it, how to keep it, and how we try to make more money by saving & investing

    Marty Rubin said, “A scale can tell what a body weighs, but not its value.” Like wise, our value comes from within – not outside of ourselves.

Thanks for reading,
Deb

Deborah Ann Fox, CPA uses her “money” knowledge to help families & small business with budgeting, homeownership/debt, tax planning (saving), cash management, etc. She is available for side-by-side, local, & remote appointments. She offers free 30-minute consultations.

http://www.debfoxfinancial.com

Financial Success: Life Lessons for all Ages & Stages – Part 1

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To celebrate the beginning of April’s Financial Literacy month, I thought I would create a series of blogs about money & financial literacy. I am starting at the beginning, when kids are young & will continue through some of the older ages & stages of life.

Part 1: Kids learn by what they see, hear, & do:

 When my niece, Ali, was 4, she used to think money came out of a machine. It made sense, she saw her Mom do it. If you want something, you just go to the machine, get the money, & go to the store. If we don’t tell them any different, kids believe what they see – money comes from a machine.

Little ones quickly learn that they need money to buy things. They need to be taught:

  • You earn money by working
  • You deposit the money you earn in a bank to keep it safe
  • You have to have money to pay for things you need – a place to sleep, food to eat, clothes to wear, maybe, even a car to go places
  • You use money you saved in the bank to pay for things you need
  • There is a difference between needs & wants – needs come 1st
  • You usually have to save money to buy something you want

Kids learn from what they hear. Do you speak positively or negatively about money?

Most of us know that kids are like little sponges & pick up on things they hear & sometimes they repeat us to our surprise (or shock): “We don’t answer the phone at our house, it might be a bill collector”. As adults, we need to be careful with our words. We also need to pay attention to other places that kids can learn by listening – TV, video games, radio, private & public places.

In today’s digital world there are so many ways to educate our kids about money; we can play fun songs for them to hear and maybe learn. One of my favorites is Sammy Rabbit; hIs dream big campaign teaches great money habits for young children. You can learn more about Sammy at http://www.dreambigday.net or sammyrabbit.com.

Kids also learn by what they do. Teaching kids to be financially successful in life should begin early. The Davidson Institute reports that money behavior habits can be formed by age 7.   When we are young, it is hard to learn that we can’t have everything we want. Parents can help by creating incentives & providing rewards.

  • Have kids write goals & create visual savings charts for something “they want”
  • Tell them that writing goals down increases their chance of success
  • Practice “learning by doing”
  • Money earned or received can be divided into 3 groups – spend, save, give. Let them decide where to give.
  • Teach “delayed gratification” – this will provide a great leap forward to becoming financially capable & successful, later in life
  • The concept of “budget” can be taught with things other than money; i.e. 1 sugary item per day – they choose when. I used to tell my son, Jason, if you want sugar on your cereal in the morning, then please don’t ask for a cookie or something else later on in the day. He frequently decided to wait because he did not know what other choices there might be later. Till this day, he still does not care for sugar much and he learned to wait for what he wants. He also works for it.

If you want to teach your kids a little about saving money, tell them that one of the best things they can do with their money, is to save it. Start early & save often. Even a little bit saved, on a regular basis, can add up to much after time. It is like planting a seed and watching it grow. Money can do the same.

A Chinese Proverb is “Learning is a treasure that will follows its owner everywhere”. Learning to make smart financial decisions when you are young will also benefit you for life.

Have fun teaching & helping others learn to make smart financial decisions. Thanks for reading.

Deborah Ann Fox, CPA is a financial literacy advocate who devotes part of her practice to helping others make smart financial decisions by providing education while building client skill levels.  She is available for one on one, local, or remote appointments. Free 30 minute consultations.

website: http://www.debfoxfinancial.com

Phone: 619-549-2717